Let Me Show You How To Raise Corporate Sponsorship: Instantly Download The Ultimate Step By Step Guide

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Let Me Show You How To Raise Corporate Sponsorship: Instantly Download The Ultimate Step By Step Guide

More than 88% of corporations contribute to charitable causes, organizations and brands yet many organizations are unsure about the best ways to develop a prospect list, prepare a proposal, approach a corporate prospect face to face, and ultimately persuade a corporation to support them.

Now, I want you to imagine with me for a moment that you have not been feeling well and decide to visit your doctor. When you arrive, he or she rushes you into the office and writes you a prescription without ever asking questions about what’s ailing you. What would you think about your doctor’s competence and ethics if that happened? While this is an extreme scenario, it’s in this same fashion that many nonprofit organizations approach corporate sponsorship when they pitch blind proposals to an unqualified prospect list. Then they wait and wonder why they got so many rejection letters — or even worse — never heard back about proposals they sent out.

I’ve fundraised in the nonprofit sector for the last 20 years, and I’m guilty of using this same approach. For a long time I was convinced that if I had a sleek proposal and a good pitch letter, the corporations I solicited would see that my organization was deserving of sponsorship, and just give us money … right?

My process was grueling. I would research for hours and find hundreds of sponsorship prospects. Next, I’d spend money on graphic design, print, and postage. And for hours, staff would help stuff envelopes and get the proposals out the door. Then I would wait. After a few weeks of waiting, the rejection letters would begin to arrive. Each time I got a rejection letter, I’d get a little more discouraged and think: there has to be a better way to raise corporate sponsorship. Now don’t get me wrong, every now and then I’d raise a few thousand dollars from a sponsor using my approach, get encouraged, and think I was on the right track. But a few years ago, I sat down and calculated the TRUE COST of my sponsorship approach and it changed everything.

 

 

Here’s what I discovered:

50 hours of prospect research between me and my assistant…………………………………….$2,400

Assistant’s data entry for two weeks ………………………………………………………………………$1,440

Graphic design of the proposal packet…………………………………………………………………….$2,500

Printing of 500 proposal packets…………………………………………………………………………….$3,000

Four staff members working 2+ days to assemble and prepare packets for mailing………$1,250

Mailed 400 packets @ $ 1.50 each…………………………………………………………………………$ 600

 

SPENT:       $ 11,190

RAISED:     $ 1,900

LOST:          $ 9,290

That day, I knew I had to change something. Working in the nonprofit sector, I’m always looking for ways to work smarter, to do things correctly the first time, and to use donations responsibly. Each time I sit down to spend money on behalf of an organization; I try to remind myself that it’s not my money I’m spending. After my cost calculation, I was on a quest to secure sponsorship in a more strategic way.

 

I spoke to people in the know. I connected with marketing, community relations, and corporate foundation directors at corporations. And found many were willing to give me candid feedback about why some proposals are funded and others are not.

Then I decided to write a book. I spoke to marketing, community relations, and corporate foundation directors at corporations and found that many of them were willing to give me candid feedback about why some proposals are funded and others are not. I also interviewed dozens of nonprofit leaders across the country to discover what was and wasn’t working as their organizations sought corporate sponsors. Last, I attended workshops, read books, and studied countless solicitation methods to learn and master the true best practices of securing corporate sponsorship.

I also continued to learn from colleagues like *Emily.

Emily is the Executive Director of a small nonprofit that works with youth in Philadelphia. In the fall of 2016, her organization received a letter from its biggest foundation sponsor. The foundation had lost assets.  In turn, Emily’s organization lost funding of $150,000. This represented 40% of her budget.

To help fill the funding gap, Emily was up for trying something she’d not tried in the past. She officially launched a campaign to solicit funding other corporations. In three weeks time, Emily created a list of corporate prospects from a local Chamber of Commerce directory, crafted a request letter and proposal, and sent out 64 proposal packages to local corporations.

 

Then she waited.

 

By the spring of 2016, five proposals had been returned due to a bad address, 21 corporations rejected the organization’s proposal, and Emily had not heard from the remaining 38 corporations she solicited.

 

Have you experienced a similar scenario?

 

According to the National Center for Charitable Statistics (NCCS), more than 1.5 million nonprofit organizations are registered in the U.S.  And most of them depend heavily on donations and charitable giving to operate.

So what separates the chosen organizations from the ones, like Emily’s organization–that doesn’t even get a callback? What do they do differently? And most importantly:

 

 

 

SO….

 

Translating all that I’ve learned from paper into practice made a significant difference in my fundraising and has helped me raise millions of dollars through corporate sponsorship — even during a bad economy.

If your organization seeks better results, needs coaching, or a roadmap to jump-start your corporate sponsorship program, I would love the opportunity to potentially save your organization thousands of dollars and countless labor hours. On the next page, you’ll get the chance to buy the book—which outlines step by step instruction for how I’ve raised over $80 million dollars to date…….

Resource the Change You Want to See in the World,

Anisha Robinson Keeys

 

  • 11 types of benefits you can offer corporations beyond logo recognition
  • The list of 22 retailers in your neighborhood that want to help your organization raise money and steps to secure sponsorship with those retailers in the next few weeks
  • The 4 questions you must ask and answer before seeking funding from corporations
  • How sending unsolicited proposals to corporations can destroy your organizations’ ability to earn a corporate funders respect
  • Why “we need the money” and “we are good cause” are not the answers to getting corporate funding (I’ll tell you what is)
  • How to structure the one-hour meeting that can help raise thousands of dollars through your board or advisors

After reading this material you will:

  • Have a sophisticated approach to creating and implementing your organization’s corporate sponsorship program
  • Be ready to develop a corporate prospect list
  • Be able to authentically align your organization’s deliverables with the goals of your corporate prospects
  • Be prepared to have a productive face-to-face meeting with prospective sponsors
  • Know how to stand apart from the hundreds of proposals corporations receive every day and get the support you need

PLUS- five time-saving sample materials

  1. Sample Sponsorship Proposals and Forms
  2. Guide for conducting a Prospect Research Meeting (sample email, invitation letter, and grid to record results)
  3. Sample Sponsorship Policy and Procedures
  4. Sample Cause Marketing Agreement
  5. Sample Letter of Sponsorship Confirmation

 

DOWNLOAD THIS ULTIMATE GUIDE NOW.

FOR 27 USD

SALE UNTIL FEBRUARY 14TH $13.00 USD

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